Goodbye 2006 – It’s Not a Happy New Year’s Eve.

31 December 2006
In fact, I wouldn’t have to sit and update my blog at this time of the year

as I had already had a plan to celebrate a New Year’s Eve and counting down to

the year 2007 at my friend’s house. However, our plan went scrap when we saw the

news of bombing in Bangkok late in the evening followed by the cancellation of

the New Year’s count-down celebration at Central World Plaza. Our joyful mood

was spoiled as almost everyone got telephone calls from family and friends

asking if we are okay. Indeed, we are physically fine, however, I am mentally

hurt. Those who ruined everyone’s cheerful spirit at this time of the year must

be psychotic freaks. How could they do this in the time of celebrations? What do

they want to achieve? Generating fears and hatred? Well, I felt sorry for them

as their souls are lack of lively spirit.

My deepest condolence goes to the family of those innocent people who

lost their lives in this shameless act. I hope we, Thai people, would find peace

and live a normal and happy life in the coming year. It’s certain that this is

not a happy New Year’s Eve but I am positive that we will have a Happy New Year

2007. Let’s cross our fingers and pray.

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Happy New Year 2007

30 December 2006
Wherever you go to celebrate New Year’s eve and count down to the year 2007, I wish you an enjoyable moment with family and friends around you. Let you fulfill your New Year’s resolutions and become a better person in the year 2007.

Happy New Year, everyone!


Internet : I (almost) can’t live without it.

28 December 2006
On the night of December 26th, 2006, there was a report of big earthquake
(in the scale of 7.1) near Taiwan southern coastline. The quake just came on the
second anniversary of the tragic Asian Tsunami. Fortunately, nothing except a
number of aftershocks happened. However, in its aftermath, the undersea
international communication cables were damaged. As a result, internet
connection and communications across Asia, including Thailand, have been
severely disrupted. That’s a reason why I couldn’t connect to my regular mailbox
at <hotmail.com> and several other web pages. Frustrated, I guess I almost
can’t live without the internet. Am I getting addicted too much to technology?
Well, now I have one more new year resolution to fulfill — try to spend less
time on the internet. Hopefully, I could make it possible.

Nike :: Wall of Expression

21 December 2006
This is enjoyable. Try browsing through "NIKE" website in Thai and find your way to the "Wall of Expression" or click here for the direct link. There you could create your own graffiti or the writing on the wall to express yourself. I have already created one at the wall number ‘0354.’ Moreover, you may also save all the graphics as a token from the digital wall to your desktop wallpaper. Stylish, isn’t it?


TIME Magazine Person of the Year: You

19 December 2006
Every year, the US TIME magazine will publish a year-end issue with a cover story of "Person of the Year." Those who have been chosen as the person of the year are the one who most affected the news and our lives, for good or for ill, throughout the year. As for this year, the magazine is due to be released on December 25th, but the person of the year for TIME magazine has already been named and it is "YOU." Yes, you and me and everyone we know (not to be confused with the name of a movie I used to write a review earlier) are the person of the year. TIME stated that we all, the Internet users around the globe, were the driving force behind today’s Internet technology where personal media such as blogs and videos could make things matter via various social networks. Websites such as YouTube, MySpace and Wikipedia provided various tools for users to interact with the world.

How do you feel? Aren’t you honored to be selected as person of the year? At least, it seems that our tiny voices added up and had been heard.

Person of the Year: You. Yes, you. You control the Information Age. Welcome to your world.


Driving Lessons

17 December 2006
The movie tells a story of a seventeen year-old -boy from a christian family with a controlling and overly religious mother. While trying to get a driving license by having a regular daily and routine driving lesson with his bossy mother, he also spent his summer vacation working as an assistant for a retired actress, Evie, who seems to be on the other side of the spectrum from his usual life-style. Without his mother consent, he was on a road-trip with Evie in a journey that would free him from his mother’s confinement.

The plot of this coming-of-age comedy is nothing new. You might be able to guess the story-line from the beginning to the ending of the movie. However, the performance of the entire cast is exceptionally high above the standard of the typical road movie. in this movie, Rupert Grint, as a lead actor, has a chance to play a more mature role from his typical Ron Weasley’s role in Harry Potter series. It seems that he developed a great deal of acting skills in a past few years. Watch him out as he would definitely shine as a bright star in the near future with more challenging roles. Veteran actress Julie Walters in the role of Evie delivered a great performance. It is astonishing to see her on-screen chemistry with Grint for friendship of different age that both characters developed through the movie.

4 stars out of 5 – even though the movie is too cliche, it satisfies audiences with fine performances of the cast. Eventually, we all go through the "driving lessons" of life reflecting from the movie.

A Trip to Marrakech, Morocco

13 December 2006
I have just been back home from a week trip to Marrakech, an ancient city in Morocco. To tell the truth, a country in Africa has never been my choice for overseas vacation. However, it was not a holiday trip. I followed a team of Thai movie "Dek Hor" – including the director Songyos "Yong" Sugmakanan and his protege actor Sirachuch "Michael" Chienthawron – participating in the general competition at the 6th annual International Film Festival of Marrakech (IFFM) with other 14 movies from different countries around the world. Although the movie didn’t win any award, the director felt grateful that Thai movie had been chosen by the festival organizer and had a chance to be screened to audiences in this region of the world where some local people don’t even know where Thailand is on the world map.

The trip was exhausted but extremely wonderful and enjoyable. Putting the festival aside, we had a chance to visit Marrakech inside out – literally from the prestigious dinner after the awarding ceremony at the city convention center (Palais des Congres) through the famous Djemaa el Fna square, the busiest square in the entire continent of Africa, and the damped street in Jewish neighbourhood where few tourist would set their feet inside. I’ve got a number of interesting stories to tell. Stay tune for an update!